Patient Comments: Inflammatory Breast Cancer - Symptoms & Signs

Question:

What were the signs and symptoms of your inflammatory breast cancer? Submit Your Comment

Comment from: Linda, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: November 06

I noticed my left breast was getting bigger. I had no pain or any other swelling. I thought it was because I was on HRT (hormone replacement therapy). After about 5 weeks I noticed a bruise on that breast. That was when I went to the doctor and was diagnosed. I had no history of breast cancer in my family. I had just had a mammogram 4 months ago which came out negative. I was extremely healthy in every other way. It was diagnosed first by a punch biopsy in the office. I then had to go through a bilateral breast MRI which was the only way they could tell how involved it was. After many other scans and tests, I fortunately had no other metastasis. I am also a registered nurse (RN) and I had never heard of inflammatory breast cancer. After everything I was told I had a poor prognosis as I had 6 lymph nodes involved. It's been 8 years now and no recurrence. I had the HER2/neu factor.

Comment from: nancy k, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: April 01

I wonder how many inflammatory maladies are caused by homes with infestation of bats. We are misled by science as to the habits of bats. They preyed upon me long term. I am a sixty year old female who is a survivor. My boots have been on the ground in an infested environment. I had no tolerance to the undetected animal bites. By October, (breast cancer awareness month) the inflammatory breast cancer occurred. My condition in the breast and gland area was painful, itchy, and swollen. Doctors did not take a close look on the lower forearms where the bites occurred. The small holes, bloody, or scars are quite round and very visible, most unbelievable! My prognosis is not grim, in fact, excellent because I moved into a secure house before the two year treatment for glandular carcinoma.

Comment from: Violet, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: May 20

Four months after a lumpectomy and radiotherapy in 2006, I developed what doctors said was an infection in my breast. Six years later, after treatment for 15 of these infections, I have been diagnosed with cellulitis. The antibiotics have been a problem for me, as I have developed an intolerance to most, and allergic reactions to anything with penicillin make my situation even more intolerable. I have constantly told doctors I suspect inflammatory breast cancer and they have constantly sent me away, saying it definitely is not IBC. They have not done a biopsy and simply expect their word to be accepted, even though I have lost all faith in consultants because they did not diagnose even cellulitis. This month I have had two outbreaks, and to be honest, I have had enough. This week I am going to the GP and basically I am going to ask to be referred back to the consultant and from there, I will demand a biopsy be done to determine once and for all what the problem is. My health has deteriorated so much in the last six years I don't look like and I am not the person I used to be at all. I have tried to get back to being “me,” but feel lost now. Some days when the pain is really bad, I just want to lie down and die.

Comment from: sherri1964, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: February 01

My right breast got very big. I got red blotches in one area which I found out later was a form of skin cancer. My nipple was inverted a little. I have done chemotherapy, then I had both breasts removed. I have done 33 radiation treatments after I got my breasts removed. Now my next step is to see the plastic surgeon. This is very scary. We all just have to be brave and always think positive.

Comment from: dawnchilds19, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: December 10

My symptoms of inflammatory breast cancer were swelling, burning, tenderness, heaviness. I'm being referred for further testing.

QUESTION

A lump in the breast is almost always cancer. See Answer

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