Patient Comments: Aphasia - Types

Question:

How did the first aphasia symptoms present in you or your loved one? Submit Your Comment

Comment from: Scared straight, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: November 06

I was ill and my type 2 diabetes went out of control. My body started flushing, and being dehydrated, I drank lots of water. Four days later, I garbled my words if I tried explaining something and had trouble comprehending. Not being in my right mind, I did not go to the emergency room until a week later. Ten days later I am having one or two episodes of aphasia but seem to be improving.

Comment from: Kristine, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: July 06

Aphasia symptoms came with my chronic migraines. The pain always originated in Broca's area. I have difficulty with expressive aphasia in many forms. Mechanically saying the word, difficulty writing, not remembering the names of objects etc. It's the first sign that a migraine is starting for me.

Comment from: Masa, 75 or over Female (Patient) Published: July 03

I think my aphasia happened after several years suffering with chronic fatigue syndrome. I was all my life in medical field. The first thing that happened was losing medical vocabulary (also English is my second language).

Comment from: skywriter, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: December 08

My first aphasia symptoms were memory loss, and inability to speak important words in a sentence.

Comment from: carole, 75 or over Female (Patient) Published: January 24

In conversation I find I sometimes have trouble finding an expressive word that I know very well. It is disconcerting to pause and watch people waiting for me to tell them a certain word. For example, I was trying to use the word 'raffle' but couldn't think of it. Also 'door prize'. I wonder if it is aphasia symptom. I have no trouble with memory, just an occasional word.

Comment from: apple, 45-54 Female (Caregiver) Published: June 04

My daughter has bouts of anomic aphasia. She has had several seizures in the past 3 years.

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